photographyweek:

De la distance focale de l’être sensible by Chris Dève
"Standing in a white field, the sun came out at the right moment. I placed a filter on my lens, lining it with vaseline and a touch of purple paint to create this soft bokeh effect."
You can see more photography by Chris on Flickr.
Image copyright Chris Dève and used with permission.
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photographyweek:

De la distance focale de l’être sensible by Chris Dève

"Standing in a white field, the sun came out at the right moment. I placed a filter on my lens, lining it with vaseline and a touch of purple paint to create this soft bokeh effect."

You can see more photography by Chris on Flickr.

Image copyright Chris Dève and used with permission.

__

See the world’s most inspirational images every Thursday in Photography Week. Get five free issues today at http://goo.gl/DWC7ND

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americanguide:

MASTER GARDENERS - SUNNYVALE, CALIFORNIA

The American conquest opened a new market for agricultural products… The period is graphically described in the diary of John Sutter, the great adventurer-agriculturist and first white man to settle the interior, who combined a longing to live in the grand style with an intensely practical passion for farming. …
“I found a good market for my products among the new-comers and the people in the Bay district” Sutter wrote of the period immediately following the American occupation. “Agriculture increased until I had several hundred men working in the harvest fields, and to feed them I had to kill four or sometimes five oxen daily. I could raise 40,000 bushels of wheat without trouble, reap the crops with sickles, thrash it with bones, and winnow it in the wind. … My best days were just before the discovery of gold.”
— California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)


Last year we made a trip to Sunnyvale’s community gardens where we met up with several of University of California’s Master Gardeners.  Located in 46 counties in the state, this group of experts helps set up community gardens, find productive methods to grow crops and also educate gardeners about how to cook with what they’ve grown.
The Master Gardeners are part of a larger UC network known as the Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources. In the late 1800s, UC researchers discovered how to remove salts from the soils of California’s Central Valley, turning what was once barren alkaline land into the most productive agricultural region in the world. 
Currently UC is trying to use its collective knowledge of food and agriculture expertise to help with a global approach to sustainable food. Examples of projects range from adapting farming practices to climate change to developing policies to help small growers become food suppliers.
You can read more about it here →
Zoom Info
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americanguide:

MASTER GARDENERS - SUNNYVALE, CALIFORNIA

The American conquest opened a new market for agricultural products… The period is graphically described in the diary of John Sutter, the great adventurer-agriculturist and first white man to settle the interior, who combined a longing to live in the grand style with an intensely practical passion for farming. …
“I found a good market for my products among the new-comers and the people in the Bay district” Sutter wrote of the period immediately following the American occupation. “Agriculture increased until I had several hundred men working in the harvest fields, and to feed them I had to kill four or sometimes five oxen daily. I could raise 40,000 bushels of wheat without trouble, reap the crops with sickles, thrash it with bones, and winnow it in the wind. … My best days were just before the discovery of gold.”
— California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)


Last year we made a trip to Sunnyvale’s community gardens where we met up with several of University of California’s Master Gardeners.  Located in 46 counties in the state, this group of experts helps set up community gardens, find productive methods to grow crops and also educate gardeners about how to cook with what they’ve grown.
The Master Gardeners are part of a larger UC network known as the Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources. In the late 1800s, UC researchers discovered how to remove salts from the soils of California’s Central Valley, turning what was once barren alkaline land into the most productive agricultural region in the world. 
Currently UC is trying to use its collective knowledge of food and agriculture expertise to help with a global approach to sustainable food. Examples of projects range from adapting farming practices to climate change to developing policies to help small growers become food suppliers.
You can read more about it here →
Zoom Info
ucresearch:

americanguide:

MASTER GARDENERS - SUNNYVALE, CALIFORNIA

The American conquest opened a new market for agricultural products… The period is graphically described in the diary of John Sutter, the great adventurer-agriculturist and first white man to settle the interior, who combined a longing to live in the grand style with an intensely practical passion for farming. …
“I found a good market for my products among the new-comers and the people in the Bay district” Sutter wrote of the period immediately following the American occupation. “Agriculture increased until I had several hundred men working in the harvest fields, and to feed them I had to kill four or sometimes five oxen daily. I could raise 40,000 bushels of wheat without trouble, reap the crops with sickles, thrash it with bones, and winnow it in the wind. … My best days were just before the discovery of gold.”
— California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)


Last year we made a trip to Sunnyvale’s community gardens where we met up with several of University of California’s Master Gardeners.  Located in 46 counties in the state, this group of experts helps set up community gardens, find productive methods to grow crops and also educate gardeners about how to cook with what they’ve grown.
The Master Gardeners are part of a larger UC network known as the Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources. In the late 1800s, UC researchers discovered how to remove salts from the soils of California’s Central Valley, turning what was once barren alkaline land into the most productive agricultural region in the world. 
Currently UC is trying to use its collective knowledge of food and agriculture expertise to help with a global approach to sustainable food. Examples of projects range from adapting farming practices to climate change to developing policies to help small growers become food suppliers.
You can read more about it here →
Zoom Info
ucresearch:

americanguide:

MASTER GARDENERS - SUNNYVALE, CALIFORNIA

The American conquest opened a new market for agricultural products… The period is graphically described in the diary of John Sutter, the great adventurer-agriculturist and first white man to settle the interior, who combined a longing to live in the grand style with an intensely practical passion for farming. …
“I found a good market for my products among the new-comers and the people in the Bay district” Sutter wrote of the period immediately following the American occupation. “Agriculture increased until I had several hundred men working in the harvest fields, and to feed them I had to kill four or sometimes five oxen daily. I could raise 40,000 bushels of wheat without trouble, reap the crops with sickles, thrash it with bones, and winnow it in the wind. … My best days were just before the discovery of gold.”
— California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)


Last year we made a trip to Sunnyvale’s community gardens where we met up with several of University of California’s Master Gardeners.  Located in 46 counties in the state, this group of experts helps set up community gardens, find productive methods to grow crops and also educate gardeners about how to cook with what they’ve grown.
The Master Gardeners are part of a larger UC network known as the Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources. In the late 1800s, UC researchers discovered how to remove salts from the soils of California’s Central Valley, turning what was once barren alkaline land into the most productive agricultural region in the world. 
Currently UC is trying to use its collective knowledge of food and agriculture expertise to help with a global approach to sustainable food. Examples of projects range from adapting farming practices to climate change to developing policies to help small growers become food suppliers.
You can read more about it here →
Zoom Info
ucresearch:

americanguide:

MASTER GARDENERS - SUNNYVALE, CALIFORNIA

The American conquest opened a new market for agricultural products… The period is graphically described in the diary of John Sutter, the great adventurer-agriculturist and first white man to settle the interior, who combined a longing to live in the grand style with an intensely practical passion for farming. …
“I found a good market for my products among the new-comers and the people in the Bay district” Sutter wrote of the period immediately following the American occupation. “Agriculture increased until I had several hundred men working in the harvest fields, and to feed them I had to kill four or sometimes five oxen daily. I could raise 40,000 bushels of wheat without trouble, reap the crops with sickles, thrash it with bones, and winnow it in the wind. … My best days were just before the discovery of gold.”
— California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)


Last year we made a trip to Sunnyvale’s community gardens where we met up with several of University of California’s Master Gardeners.  Located in 46 counties in the state, this group of experts helps set up community gardens, find productive methods to grow crops and also educate gardeners about how to cook with what they’ve grown.
The Master Gardeners are part of a larger UC network known as the Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources. In the late 1800s, UC researchers discovered how to remove salts from the soils of California’s Central Valley, turning what was once barren alkaline land into the most productive agricultural region in the world. 
Currently UC is trying to use its collective knowledge of food and agriculture expertise to help with a global approach to sustainable food. Examples of projects range from adapting farming practices to climate change to developing policies to help small growers become food suppliers.
You can read more about it here →
Zoom Info
ucresearch:

americanguide:

MASTER GARDENERS - SUNNYVALE, CALIFORNIA

The American conquest opened a new market for agricultural products… The period is graphically described in the diary of John Sutter, the great adventurer-agriculturist and first white man to settle the interior, who combined a longing to live in the grand style with an intensely practical passion for farming. …
“I found a good market for my products among the new-comers and the people in the Bay district” Sutter wrote of the period immediately following the American occupation. “Agriculture increased until I had several hundred men working in the harvest fields, and to feed them I had to kill four or sometimes five oxen daily. I could raise 40,000 bushels of wheat without trouble, reap the crops with sickles, thrash it with bones, and winnow it in the wind. … My best days were just before the discovery of gold.”
— California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)


Last year we made a trip to Sunnyvale’s community gardens where we met up with several of University of California’s Master Gardeners.  Located in 46 counties in the state, this group of experts helps set up community gardens, find productive methods to grow crops and also educate gardeners about how to cook with what they’ve grown.
The Master Gardeners are part of a larger UC network known as the Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources. In the late 1800s, UC researchers discovered how to remove salts from the soils of California’s Central Valley, turning what was once barren alkaline land into the most productive agricultural region in the world. 
Currently UC is trying to use its collective knowledge of food and agriculture expertise to help with a global approach to sustainable food. Examples of projects range from adapting farming practices to climate change to developing policies to help small growers become food suppliers.
You can read more about it here →
Zoom Info

ucresearch:

americanguide:

MASTER GARDENERS - SUNNYVALE, CALIFORNIA

The American conquest opened a new market for agricultural products… The period is graphically described in the diary of John Sutter, the great adventurer-agriculturist and first white man to settle the interior, who combined a longing to live in the grand style with an intensely practical passion for farming. …

“I found a good market for my products among the new-comers and the people in the Bay district” Sutter wrote of the period immediately following the American occupation. “Agriculture increased until I had several hundred men working in the harvest fields, and to feed them I had to kill four or sometimes five oxen daily. I could raise 40,000 bushels of wheat without trouble, reap the crops with sickles, thrash it with bones, and winnow it in the wind. … My best days were just before the discovery of gold.”

California, A Guide To the Golden State (WPA, 1939)

Last year we made a trip to Sunnyvale’s community gardens where we met up with several of University of California’s Master Gardeners.  Located in 46 counties in the state, this group of experts helps set up community gardens, find productive methods to grow crops and also educate gardeners about how to cook with what they’ve grown.

The Master Gardeners are part of a larger UC network known as the Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources. In the late 1800s, UC researchers discovered how to remove salts from the soils of California’s Central Valley, turning what was once barren alkaline land into the most productive agricultural region in the world. 

Currently UC is trying to use its collective knowledge of food and agriculture expertise to help with a global approach to sustainable food. Examples of projects range from adapting farming practices to climate change to developing policies to help small growers become food suppliers.

You can read more about it here →